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« Capitalize on Your Event Domain Name | Main | Vicarious Event Marketing & Promotion - Be Edgy! »

Email Marketing: Stop Cramming Too Much Info Into Your Email!

Cramming_Email Event planners and organizers have a tendency to try to include as much detail as possible in their promotion pieces.  Have you ever seen an event poster or ad filled to the brim with information? The same “cram as much as you can” mentality usually carries over to the email marketing of an event.  As a result – emails used to promote an event have so many details that that the reader doesn’t know where to begin. Cramming your emails full with too many details is a big event marketing mistake. You are far better off breaking the information down and focusing on one or two information points at a time.

What’s Important to Them?
Start by identifying the information most important to your prospect.  (Not what you think is important to your prospect.) Sending a bunch of irrelevant information to your target marketing isn’t going to do anything to promote your event. If you send useless information on a regular basis, people will consider you a SPAMMER. Spamming destroys your trust and credibility with prospects. Put the prospect and their informational wants and needs in the spotlight. Trust and credibility translates into more ticket buyers and people coming to your event.

One Main Point Per Email
If you have several points to convey to your prospect, send them over a series of emails. As long as you honestly try to convey information that people are interested in - you can send several emails in rapid succession.  I’ve sent emails every day for 5 days with an opt-OUT rate of less than 4.0%.

Limited Online Attention Spans
It’s important to remember that when people read information from a computer screen they tend to scan and skim as opposed to read word for word. The average attention span of an online reader is measured in seconds.  You can help the person reading your email by differentiating you writing.  Use bolds, italics, headers, and bullet points.  Make information stand out and ensure the document is easy to scan. Long emails can work, but you need to keep the interest of the reader very high.

Send Them to Your Site for Details
You can ensure your prospect gets specific details about your event by including a link to your event web site in each email. Give them a reason to click on the link . . . “For more details about our event, please visit our web site . . . (insert your link).”

Like the old adage goes . . . keep it simple stupid! Don’t overload your reader with too much information all at one time.

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Comments

Eugene Loj

Eric,

Thanks for your comment.

I think we might be coming at the same issue from different perspectives. Nowhere was it suggested to make a web page or email look unprofessional or messy. Information design and typography is extremely important to online readability. People should strive for compelling copy that's coupled with smart design. http://www.Apple.com is a great example.

- Eugene

Eric

Although your article is very good I have to strongly disagree with your solution to limited online attention spans. When I see a website with constantly changing font formatting, I automatically assume that it is a SCAM. It also looks extremely unprofessional. The better way to handle this problem is to arrange the important details on the page in a manner in which they are easy to find - in point form, along with a link to more detailed information if the reader requires more.

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