Event Planning: The Customer Avatar and Your Event

Event_planning_avatar I’m going to present a great marketing concept from two of my mentors, Eben Pagan and John Carlton.  A few years ago Eben Pagan came up with the concept of a customer Avatar.  An Avatar is the personification or manifestation of your ideal customer.  In the event marketing world your Avatar is the ideal prospect for your event.  You use your customer Avatar to better plan and market your event.

Your Ego = a Surefire Way to Sink Your Event
A cardinal sin committed by many event planners, organizers, and marketers is planning an event around their ego.  When planning your event keep in mind that people attend your event to satiate their wants, needs, and desires. I’ve seen far too many events fail miserably because an event planner or marketer thought they were smarter the people they were trying to serve. You can avoid the “ego” mistake by utilizing a customer Avatar.

Simple Questions to Build Your Event Avatar
Below are some quick questions that will help you in creating your customer Avatar for your event.  The questions below are derived from John Carlton’s Simple Writing System.

  • Who is your ideal customer? (Demographics & Psychographics)
  • What are your customer’s wants, needs, or desires regarding your event?
    (Do they have an irrational fear or desire?)
  • What message can you present to your prospect that drives them toward action?

By answering the questions above you will put yourself into a position to better understand what someone attending your event wants and how best to serve them.

Do a Survey
It has never been so easy to find out what your customer or prospect wants. The Internet gives you the ability to quickly collect information from your target market.  With a few hours of work you can quickly find out critical information about your customer and your event. Minus the details, here is what you can do . . . find online search phrases related to your event, start a PPC campaign, drive traffic to a landing/survey page, collect the data, and then compile the results.  If you have a recurring event, do a follow up survey before you start to plan your next event. 

An Already Done Avatar
If your market or industry has survey data on potential customers be sure to reference it.  You can build a very good Avatar from industry data. Most of the research might have already been done for you.

When you build your event around your customer’s wants, needs, and desires, you can’t go wrong. Having a customer Avatar to reference for your event planning and marketing is a huge step in the right direction.

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When to Start Selling Tickets for Your Event

Here is a classic question almost every event planner asks him or herself: “When should I start selling tickets for my event?” At first thought, one might think starting your ticket sales early is always better. In my experience longer ticket sale cycles almost never translate into bigger total ticket sales.  The biggest factor in determining when you should start selling tickets for your event is based on the level of ticket demand.

Event_planning_ticket_sales


Low Ticket Demand
If the ticket demand for your event is very low, it doesn’t matter how early you start ticket sales – people won’t buy.  In contrast, you can start selling tickets for your event (depending on the type of event) a few days before and sell the event out if the demand level is high enough. One good indicator for ticket demand is how many people contact your via telephone or email to inquire about tickets for your event.  If people are contacting you regarding tickets with the fervor of a hungry wolf pack that hasn’t eaten in a week, you’re in good shape.

Start Your Ticket Sales for Your Event When You Have High Demand
Ticket sales for your event should start when you’ve created enough sufficient demand to sell most of your tickets in a short period of time.  You might want to wait until you have created a sufficient level of demand before putting tickets for your event on sale.

As an example, one client recently ran a discounted advance ticket campaign that generated $15,890.00 of advance ticket revenue 58 days before their event.  The reason they were able to sell $15K+ of tickets almost two months before their event is because they made a great offer that was coupled with high ticket demand. Part of the offer included a limited number of premium level tickets to their event. The client’s total advance ticket sales paid for their event before a single person walked through the admission gate.

How would you feel if your entire event was paid for before a single person walked up to attend your event? When it comes to ticket sales, your focus needs to be on creating a high level of demand for your event.  Check out “How to Sell Out Your Event“ for a simple way to crank up to demand for almost any event.  If the demand is high enough for your ticket, then it doesn’t matter when you start to sell tickets.

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