Sharing this critical cog with your event vendors

After each event, clients execute a Customer Experience Assessment (CEA). In short, a CEA is a specialized process used to identify the strengths and weaknesses of marketing, logistics, operations, and customer experience. Think of it as a super-survey.

While conducting my own data crunching for a Platinum client, the client's CEA identified "parking" as one of the most significant customer issues at their latest event.

During a recent review of my CEA findings with my Platinum client, I asked "Do you share your redacted CEA info with your vendors?"

Their reply, "no, we always keep it internal."

I assumed that event feedback would be shared with vendors by the client. Per the above, that wasn't the case. Shame on me for not recognizing the opportunity earlier.

After that, I inquired "if I redact all the personal/customer data, can I share the data with your parking vendor?" The client replied, "yes, absolutely!"

The parking vendor my client uses is one of the best in the event business. Even better, the parking vendor is insatiable about getting any feedback they can improve their level of service.

My question to you, "are you sharing critical feedback with on-site vendors about your event?" Yes, it's extra work. Especially the scrubbing of personal and customer data.

If you aren't already, be sure to consider the above. By sharing redacted patron feedback with your on-site vendors such as parking, food, concessions, novelties, etc. You're able to raise the bar on customer experience.

If you have a personal story related to the above topic, please feel free to hit reply and let me know.

Here are some additional articles on planning a successful event:


The "X" factor of a great event ticketing company

"Your patron's event experience does not start when they walk in the front gate of your event. Their event experience starts the moment they use their hard-earned money to buy a ticket to your event. In some cases, months before your event begins."

For almost twenty years, I've been on a quest to find a truly excellent event ticketing company. The adventure has left me with a litany of lessons learned and chronic disappointment.

There was even a time when I thought all I had to do was form my own ticketing company. That didn't work out well, but I did learn a lot.

Here's one of the biggest lessons learned about selecting a superior event ticketing company. It applies to every event organizer on planet Earth.

Ironically, my strong recommendation has nothing to do with technological bells and whistles. It even ignores seemingly essential items like how much you pay in ticket fees.

(As an aside: Ticketmaster is the largest ticketing company in the world. Ask any event organizer or ticket buyer and they'll probably say, "Ticketmaster's fees are absolutely ridiculous!" Yet, Ticketmaster is the biggest ticketing company in the world.)

If the ticketing company can provide you with the following "X" factor, make them your ticket company! That "X" factor is proving extraordinary customer service to your ticket buyers (and you!), from start to finish.

Here are some key factors ...

Great ticketing companies make it easy to buy a ticket on desktop or mobile. After a person purchases a ticket, their personal and financial information are stored in a safe secure spot.

If an event attendee loses their ticket, that ticket can be easily retrieved, by the attendee. The ticketing company should provide telephone support with employees who truly understand customer service.

If you're paying ticket service fees, you and your team should not have to provide ticketing customer support.

When onsite, the ticketing scanning and entry should work near flawlessly.

Again, you'll notice that most of the items above have little to do with technology and everything to do with great customer service.

When people buy a ticket to your event they don't see the ticketing company, they see you or your organization. The same goes for when there are issues with ticketing, they only see you.

Choose your ticketing company wisely!

Want to get more event ticketing advice? Check out the articles below:


The comfort and benefit of extra event seating

A few years ago, I engaged in a heated debate with a client's operations manager. At the time, I requested an extra 25-50 seats for a sold-out premium venue of 150 seats.

There were several useless telephone calls and email debates. "Eugene, do we really need the extra seating?" My answer was a firm, "yes, absolutely!"

The operations manager's response was, "Eugene, we sold 150 tickets and there are 150 seats. We don't need more seats and we can't get the same color seats." (Yup, you read that correctly.) Ultimately, the seating request was authorized after a discussion with the client's Chairperson. And all was well in the universe.

When event attendees paid (150-250 USD) for a ticket premium ticket, it's imperative that attendees are comfortable. And it doesn't have to be just premium venue tickets! The price of extra chairs was 1.50 USD, trivial in the grand scheme of things.

If ever you find yourself in a situation of providing extra seating, always go for the additional seating option. The easiest way to sell a ticket to your next event, is a happy customer. A few extra seats can make a significant difference in your attendee's event experience.

Want to more event planning advice? Check out the articles below:


What are you putting on your ticket?

Here's a quick question to consider. It's applicable to both your online and hard stock tickets.

The question is, "what information are you putting on your event ticket?"

Most events include info such as: the name of the event, date, time, location, etc. Once in a while, you'll get an event that includes sponsor logos or a coupon/offer.

What's far less common is including information on an event ticket to improve an attendee's experience.

Ask yourself and your team, "Is there additional information that we can include that makes for a better customer experience?"

As I wrote in a recent EPR issue, don't let your attendees get to your event frustrated and get home upset. Your event ticket offers an opportunity to make sure your attendees arrive at your event happy and get home elated!

In many instances, the amount of space for information on the ticket is minimal. That means whatever information you include needs to be impactful and to the point.

Again, in what ways can you use your event ticket to improve the overall customer experience?

Your event ticket offers you a great opportunity. Make sure you make the most of it.

Here are some additional resources regarding selling event tickets online:


The Iowa Caucus catastrophe & your event

Monday's technology issues at the Iowa Caucuses reaffirms the following case study ...

(if you're a non-US reader, please do a quick US news search on "2020 Iowa Caucus" – you won't be able to miss it!)

Years ago, I was attempting to get a beer festival client to change over to an online ticketing system. At the time they utilized a half-online ticketing system.

What's a half-online ticketing system?

It's where you take payment online and then get one of your employees to manually snail mail hard stock tickets. The person manually fulfilling thousands of ticket orders was my client's General Manager.

When asked, the General Manager had indicated that manually fulfilling ticket orders added 30 hours of work to their already busy schedule.

So, with the General Manager's time in mind and a few other factors, I strongly recommended that the client change to a full online ticket solution. That's where tickets are purchased online and printed at home or work by the consumer.

The client was apprehensive about making a change. They wanted me to guarantee them there wouldn't be any issues with online ticketing. My guarantee to the client was this …

"I guarantee you that something is going to go wrong. That said, I also guarantee you when it goes wrong, I will be onsite to handle any issues promptly."

Sure enough, a significant issue arose onsite while scanning event attendees into the beer festival.

What happened?

A few hundred printed tickets had the same barcode. That meant that the first person scanned into the event without issue. After that, hundreds of "ticket already scanned" warning messages appeared on the ticket scanners.

Initially, the ticketing company insisted such a situation was impossible.

One poor guy who had one of the first duplicate barcodes was almost denied entry and he did nothing wrong! Add on top of that thousands of excited event patrons waiting to be scanned into the event. With the duplicate bar code issue, entry into the event slowed significantly. It was a real kick in the head!

Ultimately, I made good on my promise to my client. We created a quick on-site solution (in less than 5 minutes) and made all the affected patrons happy!

Back to the case of the Iowa caucus. It started with a simple coding issue. Usually, not a problem. That is until you add in the backup plan failing. After the backup plan failed, apparently there wasn't a well thought out plan. Then the chaos started, followed by a media firestorm!

When it comes to technology, especially with critical cogs like your event ticketing, prepare for the worst! Have a backup plan for your backup plan. Especially with onsite ticketing issues.

Do you have contingencies in place for when your on-site ticketing system goes down?

Play through a variety of scenarios. Such scenarios can be an online-only ticketing issue, ticket scanning issues, or a combination of both.

Also, have you practiced all your contingency plans?

Practice execution of all your backup plans with your team members. It's not enough to have a great backup plan or series of backup plans. I've seen some of the most magnificent backup plans fail, not because they weren't great, but because of an inability to execute the plan.

Be prepared and practice!

Check out the links below:


Are you just jealous or really hungry to learn?

With the days that have passed, I reflect on a few nuggets of event wisdom. Specifically, last month's observations at an international conference of event organizers.

If you haven't had an opportunity, please go back and read the "Can I buy you a drink?" post or email for context.

This year was the first year I did not have a trade show booth at an industry conference. Not having an exhibit allowed me to take in the conference in a whole new way.

In short, when you're not focused on trying to book business at your booth, you are far more aware of the subtleties around you.

One of my biggest conference takeaways is a question for every event organizer, "what's your approach to other event organizers who are far more successful than you?"

My reason for bringing up how event organizers react to the success of others tends to be very telling.

There are usually two distinct responses. This isn't absolute and I'm sure there are exceptions, but for the most part... those who are jealous of the success of others aren't doing as well as they could.

On the positive side, those who recognize the success of others and carefully study event success are far more likely to have successful events. It could be as simple as ethically borrowing and implementing one great idea.

I'm curious, "what's your approach to other event organizers who are far more successful than you?" Drop me a line and let me know.

Here are some additional nuggets of event planning advice:


Mushy, unicorn and rainbow event questions

After every event, we send a Customer Experience Assessment (CEA) for Platinum clients. Without getting into the weeds, a CEA is basically a supercharged survey. The most significant difference between the CEA and a traditional survey are the probing questions being asked.

To date, almost a million words of event feedback have been collected with CEAs for North American and European events. And the event attendee feedback is nothing short of extraordinary.

When a CEA gets shared with new clients, it's usually followed with a very uncomfortable reaction. Some of the first phrases said by clients newly exposed to CEA questions are, "we can't ask those questions" or "those questions are very negative!" Maybe. But, if you want meaningful answers regarding your event, stop asking mushy questions.

Here's the bottom line on your post-event surveys. If you're serious about improving your event, you need to ask tough survey questions. And those tough questions are going to scare the heck out of you and your team.

If you don't ask questions tough questions, you're hurting your event. How so?

Because events that ask "positive" mushy, unicorn and rainbow questions like, "what was your favorite part of our event?" are setting themselves up for failure.

It's simple. If you never receive any negative feedback about your event, (or unwilling to do so) how are you supposed to improve your event? I don't believe you can.

After your next event, be sure to ask tough questions. The questions asked should be worded to evoke feedback that helps you improve your event. Your event experience and ticket sales will improve!

Want to get more info on event surveys? Check out the articles below:


Do you know when their event experience starts?

If you were asked, "when does the customer experience for your event, start?" What would be your reply?

Many people would answer, "as soon as they walk in the gate at your event!" And an argument could certainly be made for that.

One could also make the case that the customer experience starts, once someone buys a ticket to your event. That ticket purchase could be days, weeks, or months, before your actual event.

A person just spent their hard-earned money to purchase a ticket to your event. What are you doing to facilitate the best customer experience possible?

On the plus side of technology (when it isn't rotting our brains) it gives us the ability to communicate with people in a multitude of inexpensive ways. You could email, voice (telephone) broadcast, or SMS Text your event attendees.

One year a military client used SMS text messages sent to VIP customers and made sure they knew exactly how to get to the VIP parking area. For the most part, it worked tremendously well. There were a few hiccups for people without mobile phones. But even then, a backup message was sent to customers via email broadcast, the day before. As a result, most of the VIP ticket holders showed up happy.

Another place to improve the customer experience is on the actual ticket itself. Many people still print their event tickets. Most online ticketing companies allow you to reserve a space on printed tickets to put a custom message.

A client from Texas used their printed ticket area to send people to a customer only web site link. And a backup customer only message was sent via email. The customer only web site link was a mobile responsive design that gave timely show and performer updates. And the total cost to implement was zero dollars and about 20 minutes of time!

Is there a process you have in place to facilitate the customer experience before, during, and after your event?

If you wait until they're in your front gate, it's too late!

My "go to" customer event experience mantra goes like this, "don't let them show up to your event upset and never allow them to get home angry." Use technology, even in its simplest form and make people happy!

Looking for more event promotion advice? Check out the articles below:


The egomaniac's guide to event failure

Fasten your seat belts, because things are going to get blunt!

Event organizers get themselves in HUGE trouble because they're subjective in how they plan and execute their events.

According to Princeton University's WordNet definition, a subjective person uses "judgment based on individual personal impressions and feelings and opinions rather than external facts." Mix in a subjective event organizer mindset with some ego, and you have the perfect mix for disaster.

Trust me, it's not pretty, and I've seen many utterly avoidable event catastrophes, all a result of people being stupidly subjective.

Here's the typical scenario . . . An event organizer becomes hell-bent on running an event THEIR way (also known as Captain Ahab Syndrome). The end result is that the event organizer adopts a mindset of knowing better than their own event attendees. And that "I know better" will get your event a fast pass to failure.

It doesn't matter how noble or great YOU think your event is if people don't share those same beliefs – or worst, don't care – your event will flop, GUARANTEED!

Event organizers (of the subjective type) empathically state, "It's my event, and I'll run it as I please." That is true, but it's not worth trying to reason them.

My only question is, "What happens when your event crashes and burns?" Usually, it's someone else's fault, and it turns into a finger pointing contest. Even worse is the following event organizer statement (which I've had said to me by a frustrated event organizer), "People who didn't show up to our event don't know what they're missing ... they're idiots!"

Any event organizer who considers those that didn't attend their event in such poor regard is a dolt! People didn't attend because the egomaniac event organizer failed to give the consumer a compelling reason to attend.

Fear not, there is hope! Here is what you can do to prevent yourself from falling into the subjective mindset trap . . . be objective about all aspects of your event!

Being objective focus on facts, not feelings! A well thought out event survey (or pre even survey) is massively beneficial in keeping your event planning and promotions objective. The caveat is that you have to truly embrace the survey results. One of the single best event survey questions to ask your event attendees is "what DIDN'T you like about the event?"

Yet, when I propose the "what didn't you like about the event" survey question to organizers, they get upset and refuse to use it. They believe if you ask a seemingly negative question, their event will be cast in a bad light. I'd argue they don't ask the questions because their ego can't handle the feedback.

The truth is if you ask the question from above, you're going to have to put on some ego armor. BUT, if you integrate the negative attendee feedback, you're left which a significantly more marketable event. Some might ask, "why not ask what people liked about my event?"

Because if you only focus on the positive and don't correct the negative, you'll never improve your event. When you do ask the "negative" question, you'll find people are unbelievably cordial and appreciative with their feedback.

Here are some additional articles on planning a successful event:


The egomaniac's guide to event failure

Fasten your seatbelts, because things are going to get blunt!

Event organizers get themselves in HUGE trouble because they're subjective in how they plan and execute their events.

According to Princeton University's WordNet definition, a subjective person uses "judgment based on individual personal impressions and feelings and opinions rather than external facts." Mix in a subjective event organizer mindset with some ego, and you have the perfect mix for disaster.

Trust me, it's not pretty, and I've seen many utterly avoidable event catastrophes, all a result of people being stupidly subjective.

Here's the typical scenario . . . An event organizer becomes hell-bent on running an event THEIR way (also known as Captain Ahab Syndrome). The end result is that the event organizer adopts a mindset of knowing better than their own event attendees. And that "I know better" will get your event a fast pass to failure.

It doesn't matter how noble or great YOU think your event is if people don't share those same beliefs – or worst, don't care – your event will flop, GUARANTEED!

Event organizers (of the subjective type) empathically state, "It's my event, and I'll run it as I please." That is true, but it's not worth trying to reason them.

My only question is, "What happens when your event crashes and burns?" Usually, it's someone else's fault, and it turns into a finger pointing contest. Even worse is the following event organizer statement (which I've had said to me by a frustrated event organizer), "People who didn't show up to our event don't know what they're missing ... they're idiots!"

Any event organizer who considers those that didn't attend their event in such poor regard is a dolt! People didn't attend because the egomaniac event organizer failed to give the consumer a compelling reason to attend.

Fear not, there is hope! Here is what you can do to prevent yourself from falling into the subjective mindset trap . . . be objective about all aspects of your event!

Being objective focus on facts, not feelings! A well thought out event survey (or pre even survey) is massively beneficial in keeping your event planning and promotions objective. The caveat is that you have to truly embrace the survey results. One of the single best event survey questions to ask your event attendees is "what DIDN'T you like about the event?"

Yet, when I propose the "what didn't you like about the event" survey question to organizers, they get upset and refuse to use it. They believe if you ask a seemingly negative question, their event will be cast in a bad light. I'd argue they don't ask the questions because their ego can't handle the feedback.

The truth is if you ask the question from above, you're going to have to put on some ego armor. BUT, if you integrate the negative attendee feedback, you're left which a significantly more marketable event. Some might ask, "why not ask what people liked about my event?"

Because if you only focus on the positive and don't correct the negative, you'll never improve your event. When you do ask the "negative" question, you'll find people are unbelievably cordial and appreciative with their feedback.

The "what didn't you like" question comes from Dave Pietrowski at the World's Largest Disco in Buffalo, New York. The Disco is a 25-year event that is "SOLD OUT!" numerous times before a single person walked in the front door.

Get more event planning insight:


The Consequence of a $5 Ticket Decision

Have you ever contemplated having your event take a hiatus?

There are times when not having an event is an unfortunate necessity. If you're not going to have your event, please consider some of the potential consequences.

About six years ago, a client had to make the decision to either raise their gate price to cover unexpected costs or not have their event. Because the client had very accurate attendance figures, we did some financial forecasting. A $5 USD price increase, per ticket, would cover all their additional expenses and increase profits. The event organizer insisted that the consumer wouldn't tolerate such a ticket price increase.

My recommendation was to test the $5 ticket price increase. Their customers absolutely raved about the client's event. Ultimately, the client decided not to have their event.

At the time, I strongly disagreed with the client's decision and fought hard for the price increase. That said, it's their event and their butt on the line. Not mine!

Before that, numerous competitors refused to enter the same event marketplace. It was probably out of fear and respect. That left the client with nearly zero competition for their event.

What was once a consistent annual event, was no more. And the competition pounced!

Within a year, there were at least three similar events. Instead of one marquee event, the public now had multiple choices.

A few years later, the client decided to bring back their event. Whatever dominance they had established had been diluted with all the competition. They also raised their price $5 USD, with little to no blowback.

To be fair, I can't say that competition would not have entered into the marketplace. But, nobody can deny the dominance of being first to a given market.

In the book, The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing by Al Ries and Jack Trout, it is stated: "the leading brand in any category is almost always the first brand into the prospect's mind. e.g., Hertz in rent-a-cars, IBM in computers, Coca-Cola in cola." With rare exception, the same adage applies to the event industry.

If you have domination in your event niche, not having your event could have dire consequences. Please carefully pro and con your choice. Most important of all, don't let your personal bias get in the way.

Want to get more event ticketing advice? Check out the articles below:


"How do I get more volunteers for my event?"

OA asks an important question, "How do I get more volunteers for my event?"

Without volunteers, some events wouldn't happen. This is especially true with clients who are not-for-profit organizations.

Let's start with answering OA's question. Stay tuned, because there is a quintessential secondary point!

The best place to get volunteers for your event is by going back to previous event attendees. You should have an email list of previous customers. Clients have sent a well-crafted email to previous event attendees and received all the volunteers they needed (with a catch – secondary point*).

A social media suggestion ...

You can also use, boosted (paid) Facebook posts to find volunteers. But your audience targeting methodology and post message needs to be spot on. Furthermore, if you're thinking of posting to Facebook without boosting your posts, don't waste your time! "Because as of June 2016, the Organic Reach of a Facebook Page had fallen to a mere 2%." And that was in 2016!

Source: Patel, N. (2019, February 15). Is Facebook Organic Reach Really Dead? Retrieved April 10, 2019, from https://neilpatel.com/blog/is-facebook-organic-reach-dead/

*What's the catch? (secondary point on volunteers)

One client used their email list of previous event attendees coupled with a simple "become a volunteer" email. That client received over 85 online volunteer sign-ups in less than 3 days. Two other clients used boosted Facebook ads and ended up getting more volunteer sign-ups than their events needed.

Mission accomplish, right?!? Negative!

What ended up happening is that clients, referenced above, received a flood of volunteer sign-ups. And that giant flood of interest is the point where things became tricky. Because not all volunteer's a created equal!

Years ago, a beer festival client found this out the hard way. They ended up with more than enough online volunteer sign-ups. The challenge was that at the event several volunteers confused volunteering their time with volunteering to drink a lot of beer for free. Thankfully, nobody was permanently damaged ... just bruised egos.

In hindsight, the screening of volunteers, before they signed up, would have most likely eliminated issues. And poor volunteer behavior isn't limited to beer festivals.

If you going to get your volunteers online using email or Facebook, have a well thought out screening process in place ... before allowing someone to submit their information. Your screening process should leave you with only the highest quality volunteers.

 


Cash or credit? And what the dummies do ...

Here's the tale of two outdoor ethnic festivals.

Both derive most of their gross revenue from scrumptious food and beverage sales.

One festival clears around USD 100,000 and the other approximately USD 300,000 in food and beverage. They're both 4-day events. Neither festival charges admission. And one festival has an event footprint (total useful square footage / meteres) approximately 55% smaller than the other.

Wanna guess which one takes credit cards?

Continue reading "Cash or credit? And what the dummies do ... " »


"Hookers host . . . Wine Tasting event!"

"Hookers host successful annual Wine Tasting event." Believe it or not, that was an actual article headline.

"Eugene, what the heck is going on here?!?!" I'm asking you to do a little research for your event. Specifically, research that involves successful modeling of events. Research regarding hookers?

Continue reading ""Hookers host . . . Wine Tasting event!"" »


Have you ever purchased a ticket to your own event?

Let me ask you a quick question, "have you ever purchased a ticket to your own event?" You might think this a preposterous question. How could this possibly be that important? Because you'd be amazed at how something as simple as selling a ticket could get royally messed up.

Purchase_tickets_to_your_event

In 2011, a client was selling air show tickets at a local grocery store. My focus at the time was on online ticket sales. Honestly, there a very few reasons not to sell a ticket online for your event. But that's what the client decided, and it's their event. For whatever reason, curiosity got the better of me. The web site which I maintained for the client clearly stated that you could buy online or at the local grocer. So, while going to pick up a few groceries, I decided to try a ticket to the event.

Continue reading "Have you ever purchased a ticket to your own event?" »


Does your event suffer from being overly generous?

Date: 2/24/2019

Right now, our local area is under a severe wind watch for the next 12+ hours. The forecast is calling for wind gusts up to 75 Mph / 120 Kph. Forecasters are predicting widespread power outages and property damage due to high winds. If you listen to the local media, there is plenty of discussion about being prepared. "Are you ready when the power goes out?"

Being_to_generous_with_your_event

The same cautionary approach above needs to be applied to any event. "Are you ready for when things don't go as expected?" It could be anything. Hopefully, it never happens. But if something bad happens, are you prepared?

Years ago, a not for profit organizer was forced to sell their event because they couldn't pay their debts.

Continue reading "Does your event suffer from being overly generous?" »


This Event Crashed & "Burned" ... Badly

After it happened in 2017, I tried to comb through all the news reports on the Fyre Festival. It was intended to be a “luxury music festival” on Exuma, in the Bahamas. In the end, it was a complete disaster and the organizer sent to jail. It's also a cautionary tale on event promotion gone too far! If you're going to promote your event with hype - your customer experience better match!

Fyre_Festival_Packet

Recently, two documentaries have been released on what many people consider one of the most significant event frauds in history. “Fyre Fraud” can be found on Hulu and “Fyre The Greatest Party that Never Happened” on Netflix. Please make the time to watch at least one of these documentaries.

Why watch a documentary on the Fyre Festival?

Continue reading "This Event Crashed & "Burned" ... Badly" »


Please Stop Undercharging for Your Event

Yes, this phrase is like a broken record in the event industry: “You just have to charge more!”

Undercharging_For_Your_Event
Let's be honest, it’s easier said than done. For years, event organizers have given me a deluge of reasons why they can’t raise their ticket prices. Here are just a few actual event organizer quotes over the years:

  • “Our sponsor would never approve of that price…a $20 General Admission gate ticket?”
    (Unless they’re covering all your event costs, sponsors should not be able to control what you charge for your event.)

  • “I think we’re asking the public to pay too much. We can’t charge that much!”

  • “If you think we can charge $100 for a VIP ticket to an air event in this town, you’re out of your effing mind!”
    (In this case, all VIP tickets for the event SOLD OUT at $100-$150 each.)

As with almost all monetary transactions, the price is rarely the REAL REASON that people don’t buy. A more significant reason would be if you didn’t establish the event’s value with your consumers and attendees. Don’t raise your prices unless you can get the consumers to agree (with their wallets) that they’re getting a great deal.

Continue reading "Please Stop Undercharging for Your Event" »


Having the Wrong People in Charge of Critical Revenue-Generating Tasks

Fair Warning: what follows involves a sensitive topic for some. Please bear with me, because it’s vital for the future of your event.
Volunteers are the lifeblood of many events. Without them, some events wouldn’t exist!

Volunteers_Event_Marketing

However, I have to be brutally honest with you … Critical revenue roles at your event need to be filled by those with the appropriate and proven skill sets to successfully meet this responsibility. These critical revenue roles include anything to do with advertising, marketing, social media, and website creation. Some events could also include sponsorship as a vital revenue role.

Continue reading "Having the Wrong People in Charge of Critical Revenue-Generating Tasks" »