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May 2021

The "dirty, ugly" and way under leveraged event promo

This quick nugget comes from an event marketing manager in the UK ...

As a whole, this outdoor UK event runs highly sophisticated marketing campaigns, both online and off. Honestly, some of the best campaigns in the world, with high production quality.

For all the great online content produced by the event organizers above, one content type outperforms all others.

It's dirty, ugly, and wreaks of used car sales person.

What is it?

It's telling people, "Today is the last day to buy, before ticket prices increase."

For the hundreds of pieces of content produced by the Brits, no other content comes close to driving ticket revenue like "last day to buy!"

If you're not leveraging last day to buy sales, give it a whirl and profit!

Want to get more event promotion advice? Check out the articles below:


You Need to Consider the Other 97%

By now, you're probably familiar with my "3% rule" targeting rule.

If not, here is a brief overview:

Accepting that only 3% (or less) of your local population is predisposed to attend your event is a good thing.

How so?

Because if you and your air show team focus on those most interested in attending your event, you will significantly boost the effectiveness of all your advertising. Think of the 3% rule as a precision targeting method.

One question that rarely gets asked, "what about the other 97%?" or more precisely, "shouldn't I try to target outside the 3%?" Yes, but please understand that the amount of ad spend is prohibitive for practically every event.

It is not a matter of spending thousands of additional ad dollars; it's more like millions or tens of millions of advertising dollars.

Most event organizers simply don't have that kind of money to invest in advertising. If you decide to target outside the 3%, you must carefully track advertising effectiveness!

In 2016, two clients ran carefully targeted and tracked online marketing campaigns. Both campaigns showed that the cost of capturing people's attention outside of 3% becomes astronomical.

The same ads (design and copy) were served to two different local audiences in the advertising test, the 3% audience and the general population. The advertisement presented to the general population was displayed three times more, at four times the cost, while generating 86% less revenue than the 3% campaign.

Thus, targeting outside of your 3% can be astronomically expensive.

If you haven't found your 3%, now is a great time to start! Let me know if you're interested in learning more.

Want to get more advice on planning and promoting a great event? Check out the articles below: